Crossbow

 

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1983. Exidy.

 

 

“I’m going on an adventure!!”

 

So then. Crossbow. A time of high adventure in the land of… Well, a land.

Your quest is to defeat the evil master deep within the halls of his lair, a distant castle on the horizon.

Your fellow adventurers are a brave bunch, choosing to follow you whichever path you may choose to reach the citadel.

Armed with a crossbow, your keen eye is needed to adopt a covering fire position to help your band safely across the many pitfalls, deserts, towns, volcanos, mountains and… Indeed the vast plains open up spanning many arenas of progression.

 

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Crossbow was the first arcade game to adopt digitized sound and speech and also had some impressive graphics for the time with a fully mounted crossbow upon the cabinet which in effect was a light gun, whereby the weapon would swivel on its axis pointing at the screen and the trigger was depressed to release a virtual bolt to shoot deadly creatures such as scorpions, giant ants and bats with a multitude of other hazards depending on the area of exploration.

Falling rocks, sharp shooters firing vollies of arrows and undead minions, haunting towns and streets, the adventure is indeed an epic one, offering several paths to the fortress which opens up the game for a non-repetative experience each time it’s played.

Dangerous times await as one wrong shot and it’s all over. Certain death in fact, especially if a few loose rounds catch one of your allies leaving them wounded, rendering them limping to the exit or indeed dead!

A good thing there is an abundance of fools…”Ahem” brave warriors to join you in your quest to restore order to the land.

 

 

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Crossbow was a stroke of genius for the time and worth every credit. Not so remembered as other classics from the time but upon gazing at its splendour curiosity was soon rewarded as the gameplay was fantastic and combined with visuals and sound, the whole package came to life.

This is why ‘Crossbow’ has a place in my heart and indeed the hall of fame of arcade greats.

 

 

 

Review by Rob Joy.

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