Space Firebirds

 

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1980. Nintendo.

 

So then. Nintendo! Indeed a classic name and a classic game made by the company.

 

Space Firebirds, as is described in the title, is superb arcade shooter with flawless gameplay and a stylish, simple dynamic.

As with most space shoot em’ ups from the era, the engine is a straight forward left, right and fire, moving your ship across the bottom of the arena of play.

Upon hitting player 1, the first thing brought to ones attention is the similarity to other games, such as ‘Phoenix’, ‘Galaxian’, etc, however once played the focus changes to that of a great idea reproduced into a fun and addictive game which Nintendo can be proud of.

 

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Well, where shall we begin? How about the beginning.

With a counter at the top of the screen, decreasing in amount as the alien feathered fiends are decimated, the attack ensues with diving winged marauders throwing rockets and missiles at you, whilst evading your shots to blow them out the skies.

Using other means of destruction, such as the heavy bomb, the warhead pulsates indicating a lock! Taking the missile out of action is a perilous choice as shards from the device shatter and fall out of orbit, requiring your immediate navigation

If things wasn’t difficult enough, the avery of attack contains a myriad of monsters, including the illusive Firebird, each with varying values and tactics to end your efforts and leave you floating in space for ever.

 

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Warp! Yes warp. A neat little addition to your armoury to use and ascend your way to the horizon and swathe your way through winged warriors and take out as many as possible while weaving your way to and fro, using cannon and shield to clear the way.

Nintendo, and this is my opinion of course, released a real masterpiece of a game for the day which took an idea from other companies and re-mixed it into a unique shooter with all the components required to create a challenging, fun and addictive game, earning its place in the hall of arcade classics.

 

Reach for the stars!

 

 

Review by Rob Joy.

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